Green Lab

Research Publications Lab Members Teaching Research Opportunities Long Point Volunteering

David M. Green

Professor and Director
Redpath Museum, McGill University
859 Sherbrooke St. W.
Montreal, Quebec H3A 2K6, Canada

Telephone: (514) 398-4086 ext. 4088
Fax: (514) 398-3185
email: david.m.green@mcgill.ca

 

Katharine T. Yagi

PhD (Natural Resource Science), McGill University
M.Sc. (Biology), Laurentian University
B.Sc. (Biology), University of Guelph

Contact: katharine.yagi@mail.mcgill.ca

Webpage: https://katharinetyagi.wixsite.com/profile

Current Research

My current research in David Green's lab at McGill University examines the effect of density on dispersal in pond breeding amphibians. These effects can be linked to the dynamics of isolated populations, where dispersal is key to its survival.

Amphibians are in decline at a global scale due to many impacts such as habitat loss, disease transfer and climate change. The Fowler's toad (Anaxyrus fowleri) is an endangered species in Canada, found in three remnant populations in Ontario; Niagara region, Long Point and Rondeau. Long term study of the Long Point population has shown that the main cause of population decline is likely due to the loss of appropriate breeding habitat, caused by the invasion of the common reed (Phragmites australis). The objectives of my thesis are to (1) determine the effect of density on the growth of Fowler's toad tadpoles, (2) determine whether carry-over effects are found in the adult stage of individuals reared under different density conditions, and (3) determine whether dispersal at the adult stage is affected by the individuals tadpole density condition.

Past Research

My Master's research in Jacqueline Litzgus's lab at Laurentian University examined the effect of beaver flooding on the spatial ecology and thermoregulation on a population of the federally endangered Spotted turtle (Clemmys guttata) in a historically mined peat-bog in southern Ontario. Using both historical and current radio telemetry data, my research showed that the turtles selected the newly flooded aquatic habitat over any habitat available during the drier conditions. Also, the turtles were found to have a preferred temperature range of 20-26ºC, which coincided well with the temperatures provided by the newly flooded habitats. Aestivation behaviour was also observed to be less frequent in the population during the flooded conditions, suggesting the turtles adjusted to a longer active season than during the drier historical conditions. Nesting habitat was found to be affected by the flooding, where historical nesting locations were destroyed due to the increased water levels. However, turtles were observed using new nesting locations during the study. Overall, the beaver flooding was found to have a positive impact on this population of spotted turtles.

Reports and Publications

Yagi, K.T. and D.M. Green. 2017. Performance and Movement in Relation to Post-metamorphic Body Size in a Pond-breeding Amphibian. Journal of Herpetology 51(4):482-489.

Yagi, K.T. and D.M. Green. 2016. Mechanisms of Density-dependent Growth and Survival in Tadpoles of Fowler's Toad, Anaxyrus fowleri: Volume vs. Abundance. Copeia 104(4):942-951.

Green, D.M. and K. Yagi. 2015. Ponds for Toads. Fowler's Toad Recovery and Habitat Mitigation at Long Point, Ontario. Field report for 2015. Canadian Wildlife Service, Environment Canada.

Green, D.M. and K. Yagi. 2014. Ponds for Toads. Fowler's Toad Recovery and Habitat Mitigation at Long Point, Ontario. Field report for 2014. Canadian Wildlife Service, Environment Canada.

Green, D.M. and K. Yagi. 2013. Population ecology for Fowler’s toad (Anaxyrus fowleri) at Long Point, Ontario, Field report for 2013. Canadian Wildlife Service, Environment Canada.

Green, D.M. and K. Yagi. 2012. Population ecology for Fowler’s toad (Anaxyrus fowleri) at Long Point, Ontario, Field report for 2012. Canadian Wildlife Service, Environment Canada.

Yagi, K. and J. Litzgus. 2013. Thermoregulation and Behavior of Spotted Turtles (Clemmys guttata) in a beaver-flooded bog in Southern Ontario, Canada. Journal of Thermal Biology 38(5): 205-213.

Yagi, K. and J. Litzgus. 2012. The Effects of Flooding on the Spatial Ecology of Spotted Turtles (Clemmys guttata) in a Partially Mined Peatland. Copeia 2012(2):179-190.

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